Displaying items by tag: Global Heat Transfer

Wednesday, 12 January 2022 09:32

Thermal fluid or steam?

Many of us start our day by walking to the kettle to make a tea or coffee. If you don’t clean the kettle, after a while you’ll probably see a build-up of limescale. If this happens to your kettle, you can repair or replace it for a low cost — when working with heat transfer systems, these options are far from inexpensive. Here Clive Jones, managing director of thermal oil supplier Global Heat Transfer  gives advice on choosing the right heat transfer system for your application.

Manufacturers traditionally use steam for indirect heat transfer in industrial processes. Steam based systems heat water to boiling point by igniting a flame into tubes that are submerged in water, producing steam. The steam then condenses back into water that can be collected and used again. This system is often preferred because water is easy and cheap to acquire and has no perceived environmental impact.

Alternatively, thermal fluid-based heat transfer systems operate using a burner that heats a coil containing the fluid. A pump then circulates the fluid through the system and around the plant.

What are the costs?

Steam-based systems require additional equipment such as a surge tank, water softener and blowdown heat recovery technology, to operate effectively. This is partly because, to operate at the high temperatures required for industrial processes, steam systems must operate at high pressures of about 85 bars or 8,500 kPa.

If the steam reaches a critical pressure and the system has no way to vent it, it can cause pipes to burst, leading to costly downtime. Using steam-based systems may also put staff at risk — hot steam escaping from burst pipes or shrapnel from the burst pipe has the potential to harm employees. Operators must therefore continually monitor the system to keep employees safe.   

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On the other hand, thermal fluid systems are simpler and cheaper because, unlike steam, they do not have to work at high pressure to maintain a constant temperature. Heat transfer fluids can operate at precise, high temperatures for extended periods of time and manufacturers can control the temperature depending on the application. These systems operate at atmospheric pressure and can easily be well vented, reducing pressure on pipes and improving safety for employees. While heat transfer systems may be the more efficient option, manufacturers should still carry out proactive maintenance. Monitoring thermal fluid condition with regular sampling and analysis enables manufacturers to identify and solve issues before they negatively impact production, preventing risks to safety and costly downtime.

Maintaining uptime and efficiency

Thermal fluids are more versatile, as manufacturers can select a fluid that is designed for a specific application, increasing its efficiency. There are a number of fluid options on the market, both synthetic and mineral, that have unique temperature ranges and recommended uses. For example, Global Heat Transfer supplies a range of high and low temperature heat transfer fluids, including Globaltherm® FG, a food-grade thermal fluid specifically manufactured for food and beverage processing, or Globaltherm® Syntec, a high temperature heat transfer fluid designed for use in the chemical industry. Manufacturers can work with a thermal fluid specialist to select a fluid that best meets the needs of their application.

Maintenance requirements

Water used in steam systems needs to be chemically treated to extend the lifespan of the system. However, corrosion is common, even in systems using distilled water, so operators must regularly monitor and maintain the system to reduce the risk of unexpected downtime.

Thermal fluids also require monitoring and maintenance because they degrade over time, particularly if running at high temperatures for long periods. For example, during the degradation process, thermal oils can be broken down into carbon molecules, which can stick to the pipes and reduce heat transfer efficiency. Regularly analysing fluids enables operators to monitor fluid condition and take any steps to slow down the degradation process, ensuring optimum efficiency.

Operators should also implement a proactive maintenance programme, such as Thermocare, which can include a remote monitoring solution that regularly monitors fluid. This sends instant alerts to site engineers when a sudden change occurs that may affect productivity, enabling companies to better manage their heat transfer fluid.

Overall, thermal fluid heating systems are safer, more efficient, cheaper to maintain and have better temperature control than using steam. Investing in thermal fluid heating systems prevents additional costs to maintain safety and efficiency, providing they are well maintained over time. So, you can sit back, relax, and pop the kettle on.

For more information on thermal fluid systems, and how to choose the right one visit: https://globalhtf.com/.

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

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Thermal fluid analysis is vital to monitor fluid condition and ensure that maintenance is carried out when needed to prevent unnecessary degradation, which can affect product quality, productivity and energy consumption. Thermal fluid specialist Global Heat Transfer has made thermal fluid testing and analysis faster than ever with the opening of an in-house laboratory at its Staffordshire facility.

From its new in-house laboratory, the only specialist thermal fluid testing lab in the UK, independent technicians can quickly and effectively analyse samples of thermal fluid from Global Heat Transfer’s customers. To understand fluid condition, lab technicians perform an eleven-point quality assured test, conducting checks such as carbon level and number of insoluble particles, a closed flash point test and the acidity level (TAN), which results in an expert analysis based on trend data producing an accurate thermal fluid evaluation.

Customers receive a fluid report detailing the findings, with recommendations based on a variety of factors. Global Heat Transfer’s engineers will interpret the data to give tailored advice on maintaining thermal fluid efficiency based on the individual history of your system and fluid condition. The addition of the new laboratory will allow Global Heat Transfer to provide vital recommendations faster and more effectively, allowing customers to quickly implement actions to maintain the fluid, improving heat transfer efficiency while reducing costs and the risk of downtime.

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“The opening of the new in-house laboratory will allow companies to access the same high quality of testing, with results returned much quicker,” explained Clive Jones, managing director at Global Heat Transfer. “Faster testing will allow companies to take rapid action in response to any problems identified, keeping their thermal fluid system working effectively and their employees safe.”

Frequent representative testing of heat transfer fluids while the fluid is hot and circulating allows companies to identify early warnings regarding process problems. Timely reactions to these warnings can help companies avoid replacement of costly equipment and extend the life of thermal fluid. Sampling in line with legislative requirements, including the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR) and the Explosive Atmosphere Directive (ATEX 137), helps to maintain a safe and efficient working environment and could even save lives.

Sampling methodology is crucial to get accurate results and correct interpretation of data is essential. The complexity of this process may seem intimidating, but the expertise of Global Heat Transfer’s engineers can simplify the process. Customers can access this sample analysis as a standalone service or as part of a Thermocare package.

If you want fast results and advice to maintain your thermal fluid efficiency, talk to experts at Global Heat Transfer on +44 (0)1785760555 or get a quote at  www.globalhtf.com/contact/general-enquiry-form/.

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

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Wednesday, 17 November 2021 10:36

Optimising a new thermal fluid system

According to research by Information Technology Intelligence Consulting (ITIC), 98 per cent of organisations say a single hour of downtime costs around £75,000. While manufacturers understand that carrying out regular maintenance will reduce the risk of downtime, taking the time to properly design and install a system can increase equipment lifespan, particularly when working with thermal fluid systems. Here Clive Jones, managing director of thermal fluid supplier, Global Heat Transfer, explains how to optimise a new system.

The design of a thermal fluid system will impact how well the fluid performs once in use. Factors such as the positioning of the pipework, ventilation and installation steps will impact the lifespan of the system. Therefore, taking the time to develop the best system for the application is a worthwhile investment.

Design considerations

When designing a new heat transfer system, taking the time to get it right and carefully considering each component will prevent problems from occurring later down the line. Choosing the right equipment for the application, such as the pipework, valves and tank, is essential in producing a reliable, leak free and efficient system.

There are a variety of different types of thermal oil available, both synthetic and organic. Matching the fluid type and operating temperature to the system and application will preserve fluid life, reducing machine downtime later down the line. In some applications it may be necessary to adhere to industry specific guidelines, such as using food grade heat transfer oil for manufacturers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical processing.

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Are you insured?

Not many operators are aware but talking to insurers before installation is an important step. They can advise on factors such as frequency of sampling, correct steps to take when sampling and what training they need. If a heat transfer system is not managed to the insurer’s stipulation, the industrial facility may not be covered at all.

Successful set up

Some components in the system only have a function during installation and must be removed before introducing thermal oil. A strainer, for example, is only required during installation to catch debris that enters the system during construction. Keeping the part in the system can lead to carbon build up, causing flow issues. System designers can consult on components to remove after installation.

Prior to introducing the heat transfer fluid, engineers must clean and flush the system to remove any contaminants. Cleaning and flushing fluid should be circulated in the system at 108-122 degrees Celsius. This temperature range is key because it activates the detergent additives in the cleaning fluid, allowing it to mix with suspended loose particles.

After cleaning, the system can be filled with heat transfer oil. Once the system is circulating at proper levels in an expansion tank, heat is applied in 15 degree increments until the transfer fluid reaches 105 degrees Celsius.

Water in the system can lead to contamination with larger particulate matter and iron, so it is important to remove any water during start up. This can be done by increasing the temperature to 115 degrees to boil off any water. Alternatively, Global Heat Transfer can temporarily install a Light Ends Removal Kit (LERK) to remove water more efficiently. Once all water is removed, the heat can be increased up to 125 degrees then upped in increments to 140 degrees.

Machine downtime costs the manufacturing industry tens of thousands of pounds per hour. A well-designed and properly set up thermal fluid system can work efficiently for longer periods of time, preventing system failure and reducing unnecessary costs.

The team at Global Heat Transfer can help to project manage your new heat transfer system, from the initial enquiry, to design, and installation. For more information contact Global Heat Transfer by calling +44 (0)1785 760 555 or visiting https://globalhtf.com/contact/.

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

Published in Food & Materials
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Monday, 25 October 2021 10:31

Top tips for avoiding food contamination

All parties involved in the food processing chain have a responsibility to ensure that food reaching consumers does not become contaminated. While manufacturers already take steps to prevent the main causes of contamination, thermal fluid could be a hidden contaminator. Here Clive Jones, managing director of heat transfer fluid specialist Global Heat Transfer, explains how thermal fluid choice and maintenance can prevent cross-contamination being a problem. 

Cross contamination can occur at any stage of the food production chain, so food processing facilities have processes and procedures in place to remove any risk of product mishandling. These are built on an understanding of how cross-contamination occurs — food handling is one of the main causes of cross contamination. For example, a worker may handle raw meat without gloves and then touch other food products without washing their hands. Food residue left on equipment can also provide opportunities for contamination, as well as the harmful bacteria often found on raw products, for example if blood from raw meat drips onto uncovered products.

Food processing applications, such as brewing, baking or freezing, often require indirect heating or cooling generated from a heat exchanger and transported using thermal fluid. The fluid may absorb excess heat energy and take it away from the product, or transfer heat energy to the product.

Thermal fluid contamination

Heat transfer fluid is transported around a facility in pipes, meaning that it is unlikely to come into direct contact with a product. However, if any issues occur in the system that leads to leaks or breakages, the fluid could contaminate the product. If food and beverage manufacturers use a standard heat transfer fluid and there is incidental contact with the product, the whole batch must be scrapped to avoid any contaminated food reaching consumers, damaging their health and the company’s reputation.

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Food grade fluid

In any environment where thermal fluid may come into contact with a consumable product, manufacturers should consider using a food grade thermal fluid. Food grade thermal fluids must carry a HT-1 certificate, granted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the NSF International, to be approved for use in food processing. They are typically colourless, non-toxic, non-irritating and non-fouling, so if they do come into contact with food and therefore consumers, they lead to lower recall rates.

Food and beverage processing reactions take place at very specific temperatures, so manufacturers require a fluid with precise temperature control. Global Heat Transfer's Globaltherm™ FG, for example, can operate and maintain temperatures ranging from -20 to 326 degrees Celsius. It has outstanding thermal oxidation stability and a lower viscosity than standard mineral oils, so it is easier to pump around the system. This thermal fluid has HT-1 certification and is accredited for use in Kosher and Halal applications.

Fluid maintenance

While incidental contact between the HT-1 certified fluid and the food product will not pose a risk to consumers, manufacturers should still do everything possible to prevent any maintenance issues that could lead to the fluid impacting production.

Thermal fluids degrade over time, especially when operating at high temperatures for long periods of time. Fluid degradation can cause a build-up of carbon and other by-products in pipes, reducing heat transfer efficiency and causing products to be cooked inconsistently. If the fluid is properly maintained, manufacturers can slow down the degradation process and reduce the risk of unplanned downtime.

To achieve this, manufacturers can implement a preventative maintenance programme. This should include regular visual walk-round checks, as well as quarterly fluid sampling to determine the condition of the fluid. Engineers can samples taken from a live, hot and circulating system to a laboratory for fluid analysis, using the results to plan preventative actions to maintain or expand fluid lifespan.

The food processing sector must uphold the highest standards to ensure food safety and prevent cross-contaminated products from reaching consumers. By selecting a food grade thermal fluid and carrying out regular fluid analysis and maintenance checks, plant managers can ensure that their products are manufactured safely and efficiently.

For more advice on choosing and maintaining thermal fluids, visit www.globalhtf.com.    

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

Published in Food & Materials
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Thursday, 30 September 2021 09:03

Thermal fluid or steam?

Many of us start our day by walking to the kettle to make a tea or coffee. If you don’t clean the kettle, after a while you’ll probably see a build-up of limescale. If this happens to your kettle, you can repair or replace it for a low cost — when working with heat transfer systems, these options are far from inexpensive. Here Clive Jones, managing director of thermal oil supplier Global Heat Transfer gives advice on choosing the right heat transfer system for your application.

Manufacturers traditionally use steam for indirect heat transfer in industrial processes. Steam based systems heat water to boiling point by igniting a flame into tubes that are submerged in water, producing steam. The steam then condenses back into water that can be collected and used again. This system is often preferred because water is easy and cheap to acquire and has no perceived environmental impact.

Alternatively, thermal fluid-based heat transfer systems operate using a burner that heats a coil containing the fluid. A pump then circulates the fluid through the system and around the plant.

What are the costs?

Steam-based systems require additional equipment such as a surge tank, water softener and blowdown heat recovery technology, to operate effectively. This is partly because, to operate at the high temperatures required for industrial processes, steam systems must operate at high pressures of about 85 bars or 8,500 kPa.

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If the steam reaches a critical pressure and the system has no way to vent it, it can cause pipes to burst, leading to costly downtime. Using steam-based systems may also put staff at risk — hot steam escaping from burst pipes or shrapnel from the burst pipe has the potential to harm employees. Operators must therefore continually monitor the system to keep employees safe. 

On the other hand, thermal fluid systems are simpler and cheaper because, unlike steam, they do not have to work at high pressure to maintain a constant temperature. Heat transfer fluids can operate at precise, high temperatures for extended periods of time and manufacturers can control the temperature depending on the application. These systems operate at atmospheric pressure and can easily be well vented, reducing pressure on pipes and improving safety for employees. While heat transfer systems may be the more efficient option, manufacturers should still carry out proactive maintenance. Monitoring thermal fluid condition with regular sampling and analysis enables manufacturers to identify and solve issues before they negatively impact production, preventing risks to safety and costly downtime.

Maintaining uptime and efficiency

Thermal fluids are more versatile, as manufacturers can select a fluid that is designed for a specific application, increasing its efficiency. There are a number of fluid options on the market, both synthetic and mineral, that have unique temperature ranges and recommended uses. For example, Global Heat Transfer supplies a range of high and low temperature heat transfer fluids, including Globaltherm® FG, a food-grade thermal fluid specifically manufactured for food and beverage processing, or Globaltherm® Syntec, a high temperature heat transfer fluid designed for use in the chemical industry. Manufacturers can work with a thermal fluid specialist to select a fluid that best meets the needs of their application.

Maintenance requirements

Water used in steam systems needs to be chemically treated to extend the lifespan of the system. However, corrosion is common, even in systems using distilled water, so operators must regularly monitor and maintain the system to reduce the risk of unexpected downtime.

Thermal fluids also require monitoring and maintenance because they degrade over time, particularly if running at high temperatures for long periods. For example, during the degradation process, thermal oils can be broken down into carbon molecules, which can stick to the pipes and reduce heat transfer efficiency. Regularly analysing fluids enables operators to monitor fluid condition and take any steps to slow down the degradation process, ensuring optimum efficiency.

Operators should also implement a proactive maintenance programme, such as Thermocare, which can include a remote monitoring solution that regularly monitors fluid. This sends instant alerts to site engineers when a sudden change occurs that may affect productivity, enabling companies to better manage their heat transfer fluid.

Overall, thermal fluid heating systems are safer, more efficient, cheaper to maintain and have better temperature control than using steam. Investing in thermal fluid heating systems prevents additional costs to maintain safety and efficiency, providing they are well maintained over time. So, you can sit back, relax, and pop the kettle on.

For more information on thermal fluid systems, and how to choose the right one visit: https://globalhtf.com/.

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

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According to statistics from The Home Office, Fire and Rescue services in the UK attended 14,308 fires in non-dwelling buildings in 2020. The effects of fires in the workplace can be devastating, causing injury as well as significant damage to property and the surrounding environment. However, most fires are preventable when employers implement the correct preventative measures. Here Clive Jones, managing director of thermal fluid specialist Global Heat Transfer, outlines the three key steps to managing thermal fluids in accordance with regulations.

Any facility that uses heat transfer systems containing thermal fluid must proactively maintain them to mitigate for potential risks associated with explosive atmospheres in the workplace. These atmospheres can be caused by dangerous substances like flammable gases, mists or vapours, or by combustible dust — if any of these mix with air under atmospheric conditions, they can ignite and cause significant damage.

Thermal fluids are heated to very high temperatures for extended periods of time, so if they are not properly managed, they will begin to degrade. As they degrade, the bindings of hydrocarbon chains will begin to break, causing the flash point, the minimum temperature at which a fluid’s vapours will ignite in the presence of an ignition source, to decrease. If fluid condition continues to deteriorate and the system is not regularly maintained, it can increase the risk of fire.

For example, if degraded fluid is leaking from the system, the hydrocarbons produced during degradation are released as vapours, known as volatile light ends. Leaks can also produce a spray of fine material — the greater the pressure, the higher the risk.

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Regulations explained

The Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR) of 2002 and the Explosive Atmosphere Directive (ATEX 137) are mandatory requirements for minimising safety risks and protecting workers from fire and explosion where flammable or explosive materials are present.

This legislation sets out the legal requirement for thermal fluid systems and representative fluid analysis and requires that employers provide a safe working environment. Employers have a legal obligation to comply with this legislation and maintain documentary evidence.

Managed risk

New thermal fluid does not go from being fit for use to needing replacement overnight, but it will degrade over time and create by-products that reduce the efficiency of the system.

Closely monitoring thermal fluid condition is key to reducing the risk of fire in facilities. Engineers should take a sample when the system is hot, closed and circulating to gain an accurate representation of what is happening inside the system. Engineers can use the analysed samples to monitor flash point temperature, intervening if the temperature lowers.

Installing a remote condition monitoring system alongside regular sampling enables manufacturers to monitor and manage fluid condition more closely. For example, Thermocare® 24/7 Live Condition Monitoring is a cloud-based remote monitoring system that continually monitors fluid condition, sharing real-time data with the cloud. The platform can determine the presence of degradation factors and warn maintenance personnel with an alert to smart devices if it detects anomalies.

Safe site

Under DSEAR legislation, employers must carry out regular risk assessments of any work activities involving dangerous substances, like thermal fluids, and implement measures to eliminate these risks.

A system audit and survey includes a thermal fluid and system risk assessment to check the condition of different system components like the heaters and pumps, storage and dump tanks and insulation. Auditors will also carry out fluid analysis and check maintenance and training procedures, making any recommendations to improve these areas and ensure compliance.

Knowledgeable staff

Staff will have varying degrees of knowledge of heat transfer systems, with some having operated steam versions before and others never having encountered a heat transfer system at all.

Plant managers should ensure that the facility always has members of staff available on site that have been trained in thermal fluid systems and fluid management to ensure site and staff safety. Training should cover the basic system operations, like start-up and shut down procedures. Training should also include a comprehensive list of what maintenance staff should check on a regular basis, including potential leaks, wear and tear, faulty gauges, heat and flow. If manufacturers don’t want to handle the training themselves, they can outsource it to a thermal fluid expert.

Although businesses cannot predict whether fires will occur, they can take preventative measures to minimise risk. Thorough training, site safety procedures and regular thermal fluid analysis ensures that facilities with heat transfer systems have taken all the steps required to comply with DSEAR legislation and make employees feel safe.

For more advice on regulatory compliance when working with heat transfer fluids, contact Global Heat Transfer by calling +44 (0)1785 760 555 or visiting www.globalhtf.com/contact.

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

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Wednesday, 07 July 2021 12:37

The importance of proactive boiler maintenance

Thermal fluid systems are commonly made up of three key components — a thermal fluid boiler or heater, an expansion tank and thermal fluid circulating pumps. If all these components are well maintained, a thermal fluid system can last for several decades. However, because a boiler operates silently in the background of the facility, engineers often overlook it. Here Clive Jones, managing director of thermal fluid supplier, Global Heat Transfer, explains the importance of proactive boiler maintenance and offers advice on best practice.

Traditionally, industrial boilers operated for around 15 years before they needed replacing. After years of development and research into other factors that we should consider, such as size and operation hours, we now have more robust solutions that can last up to 30 years — but only if it is well maintained.

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Why invest in maintenance?

When a boiler, regardless of age, shows clear signs of wear or damage, the heat transfer fluid system can have reduced functionality, reliability and safety. Under safety legislation, employers must ensure that all combustion equipment, such as boilers, incinerators and air heaters, undergoes regular inspection to check the systems are not deteriorating and causing a safety risk to workers.

Regular boiler maintenance is also key to reducing the risk of carbon monoxide and dioxide build-up that can cause serious injury and unexpected downtime. Over time, thermal fluid degradation can lead to a build-up of carbon residue, also known as ‘coke’, in the system. Without regular maintenance, the build-up of carbon can cause blockages, reducing efficiency and increasing internal pressure and the risk of pipes bursting.

Regular testing

Paying constant attention to the thermal fluid system’s condition and carrying out periodic boiler tests can help facilities managers to avoid costly downtime. We also recommend performing regular thermal fluid tests to better understand the condition of the boiler.

Engineers should periodically analyse heat transfer fluid as part of a routine thermal fluid maintenance programme, such as Global Heat Transfer’s Thermocare. Engineers should collect the thermal fluid sample when the system is hot, closed and circulating to gain an accurate representation of fluid condition and identify any signs carbon build-up.

If the boiler continues to be inefficient, businesses should consider if problems are occurring elsewhere. Blockages, faulty exchanges, or fluid pumps that are spilling oil can cause temperature problems in the system. Alternatively, electrical or chemical faults can lead to intermittent lockouts or faults in the boiler. If facilities managers do not have the expertise required to fix or maintain this complex system in-house, a thermal fluid expert can perform the relevant tests and servicing needed to extend boiler lifespan.

As the industrial boiler industry becomes more efficient and longer lasting, maintenance should not be forgotten. By taking steps to proactively maintain your fluid and heat transfer system and knowing the signs to look out for, you can protect your employees from unsafe working conditions and reduce the cost of reinstalling a new industrial boiler.

About Global Heat Transfer: Global Heat Transfer is a thermal fluid specialist, providing heat transfer engineering assistance and thermal fluid supplies. Services offered include sampling and analysis, 24 hour delivery of premium quality thermal fluids, system drain down / cleaning / waste management, planned maintenance programs and a broad portfolio of affiliated system design and installation services. It is part of the Global Group of companies.

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